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Lucky Charms Cannabis Strain Review

April 24, 2020 Marijuana Strains Comments Off on Lucky Charms Cannabis Strain Review

Lucky Charms Cannabis Strain

Sharing a name with a favorite childhood breakfast treat, the Lucky Charms cannabis strain gets its name from its colorful, powder dusted exterior more than anything else. The herb’s flavor and aroma is suspiciously reminiscent of Fruity Pebbles – another cannabis cultivar with a popular breakfast food moniker. Lacking that signature marshmallow flavor, you might find that Lucky Charms doesn’t really live up to the taste that its attention-grabbing name inspires.

Nonetheless, it can give you that mood boost that you’re looking for. Just like a bowlful of your favorite breakfast cereal, this cultivar can turn that frown upside down. Infusing your mind with a load of happy hormones, this herb promises to lift up your spirits just enough to help you get through the day with a subtle smile across your face. So sit back and take a drag, because today’s going to be your lucky day.

 

Origins of the Lucky Charms Cannabis Strain

The Lucky Charms herb is a slightly sativa-leaning hybrid that comes from a cross between The White and Appalachia. Sure, they’re not quite the superstars you would expect, but these dark horses possess some pretty wicked chemistry that makes them well worth the awestruck look.

Appalachia is a cannabis rarity, available only to those who have top-tier cannabis hunting prowess. The herb results to a dreamy, head-centric buzz that lifts away physical distress, letting you float on through the day without a care in the world. Its earthy, sandalwood flavor definitely isn’t for the low-tolerance user. But a seasoned veteran should find its flavor to be particularly tantalizing.

The other parent – The White – is an indica-leaning hybrid that touts a very gentle – if not completely undetectable – peppery, citrusy flavor that’s blanketed in an herbal, leafy tang. But while it does lack both flavor and aroma, this cultivar makes up for it with strong body and head sensations that envelope the body in a cozy swaddle of calm and carefree joy.

 

Lucky Charms Cannabis bud

 

Aroma and Appearance

The first thing that will pop out at you when you take a closer look at the Lucky Charms herb is that it comes in a coat of kief-like powder. The dusted aesthetic can definitely draw your attention closer, making each little nug look like they were unearthed from a rainforest mile away from human civilization. The dust – a fine coat of fluffy trichomes – is what produces the cannabinoids that give the Lucky Charms strain its distinct chemical structure.

The smell of the strain is incredibly reminiscent of the Fruity Loops variety. A concoction of different fruity essences, the Lucky Charms strain smells more like a bowl of tropical fruit than a serving of sweet, refined breakfast sugar. Nonetheless, the aroma can be exceedingly delightful, tickling the nostrils with its delicate appeal.

So how did it get its name? Well, the Lucky Charms herb touts a colorway that’s about as vibrant as the cereal itself. With virtually every hue beautifully blotched on the herb’s exterior, the Lucky Charms cultivar can look like it was pulled straight out of Lucky the Leprechaun’s pot of treasure.

 

Experience and Effects

With a bowlful of Lucky Charms, you’re definitely in for a lucky day. This delightful herb delivers a mouthful of fruity flavor, with notes of citrus, mango, banana, and berry swirling together in an endless vortex of lip-smacking delight. But while you’re distracted with the smooth, silky, flavor-packed smoke, the Lucky Charms herb seeps into your bloodstream to get started on its work.

The immediate effect is an uplifted mood. As the furrow between your brow starts to disappear, you’re likely to feel the cares and burdens of daily life slowly lifting off of your shoulders. Suddenly, things aren’t so bad and you can finally laugh off all of those little worries and tensions that have bogged you down all week.

Your body feels lighter, your energy, brighter, and you’re just overall, in a great disposition. Yes, the Lucky Charms effect can be a wonderful and simple way to turn around a bad mood. And the best part is that you’re kept completely lucid throughout the experience – no knock-out punch here, friends.

 

Lucky Charms Cannabis flower close up

 

Growing and Processing

The Lucky Charms strain isn’t what you would call a newbie-friendly plant, but beginners hoping to step up their growing game might find it to be a suitable challenge. These shrubs take loads of long-wearing patience, taking up to 12 weeks before letting you get your hands on a harvest. And even after the long wait, the yield might not be what you expect, averaging around 3 to 4 ounces for every square foot.

Well, at least it’s not too prone to mold and mildew. If there’s anything that’s challenging about growing Lucky Charms, it’s that the plant is exceedingly partial to sunlight and warmth. So you’re task is to make sure that it gets all the sun and air it can get. That means constant topping and pruning, helping the plant clear away top growth to give lower branches more room to expand and reach out.

 

Who Is It For?

The delightful, easy-going effects of the Lucky Charms strain can be a smart stepping stone for beginners who don’t really want to dwell into more challenging strains all at once. Nonetheless, the ultra-controlled and lucid effects can also be a good choice for users who have more experience but still want something a little less overpowering.

Of course, the Lucky Charms strain isn’t the easiest to bring to maturity. With specific environmental needs and a modest return, the plant might not be your first pick if you were hoping to start off your very own canna-based products business. Even then, the humble home gardener hoping to meet their own personal cannabis needs might find the Lucky Charms herb to be sufficiently rewarding, especially because it lets off that sweet, fruity aroma long before harvest.

 

 

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