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CBD Hemp Flower – What Is It, Where to Buy & Legality

CBD extraction is one of the most popular reasons for the cultivation and sale of hemp flowers. Although cannabinoids can be extracted from any part of the plant, the flower is where the largest concentration is found. This is why it is important to find the best CBD flower for sale for your retail store.

CBD hemp flower

CBD hemp flower essentially refers to the reproductive organ of the female hemp plant. When the hemp flower reaches full bloom, the bud (as the flower is often called) secretes certain cannabinoids and resin to attract the pollen from the males and produce seeds. When it comes to CBD production, seedless flower is the best option.

However, not all hemp flowers contain the same levels of CBD. The exact percentage depends on the strain of each plant. Usually, high CBD hemp flower is derived from specially bred plants that have been carefully propagated to produce bigger buds and carry on a high CBD – low THC profile for compliance reasons.

Compliance and legality

According to US legislation, hemp is defined as “cannabis that contains less than 0.3% THC.” The 2018 Farm Bill clearly states that hemp and CBD are officially removed from the Schedule I controlled substances list and are now standard agricultural commodities. Hence, the cultivation of high CBD hemp plants is legal throughout the United states.

Thanks to the passage of the national 2018 Farm Bill, CBD hemp flower is now legal for cultivation, transport, sale or purchase, possession and use in all 50 of the United States. Marijuana, by contrast, is still illegal federally and only legal for medical and/or recreational use in certain states. The Farm Bill extends the legalization of CBD hemp flower for five years, at which point the issue will need to be raised again to maintain its legality.

How is CBD hemp flower different from marijuana buds

Hemp that has been specifically bred for high CBD production might have a similar look and feel with standard marijuana plants. However, the key difference is the THC content, which, as stated above, is below the legal limit of 0.3% in hemp plants. The two plant species also have striking visual differences, with hemp being taller and skinnier than marijuana, with less dense buds.

How can high CBD hemp flower be used

CBD hemp flowerWith CBD being such a valuable commodity for its therapeutic properties, there are many uses for high CBD hemp flower both in the B2B and retail markets. CBD oils, tinctures and edibles are just some of the many parts of this emerging market.

As a business, you can purchase wholesale CBD hemp flower which you can subsequently extract. As the CBD industry is expected to skyrocket in the following years, there is a lot of profit margin for products such as:

The key part of purchasing high-quality CBD hemp flower is to build a relationship of trust with the cultivator. Make sure that your products are tested for quality and terpene content by in-house and third-party laboratories. Here at Industrial Hemp Farms, we offer a wide selection of wholesale high CBD hemp biomass. If you are interested in learning more, contact us and we’ll be happy to walk you through our process (and our facilities).

CBD flower extraction methods

While you can always sell CBD hemp flower directly at the market, there is much more money to be made from refined products. Before that can be done, however, you’ll need to extract the active ingredient (cannabidiol) from the hemp biomass (in this case, the flower).

Despite popular misconception, CBD hemp flower is not the same thing as cannabis or marijuana flower. Both CBD hemp and marijuana are members of the same taxonomic Family, Cannabaceae, along with hops and other softwoods. They also happen to be in the same taxonomic Class as roses. The primary differences between hemp and marijuana in terms of their effects on humans boil down to their constituent cannabinoids, the active chemical compounds in cannabis plants.

There are 104 different cannabinoids found in plants in the cannabis family, the most prevalent and commonly known of these being THC (tetrahydrocannabinol) and CBD (cannabidiol). Cannabis sativa and indica flowers, commonly called marijuana, contain enough THC to produce a psychoactive effect on the brain or euphoric effect on the body and only the smallest proportions of CBD. Hemp, by contrast, contains a large amount of CBD but little to no THC. The benefits, side effects and current legal status of CBD hemp flower in the United States are therefore distinctly different from those of marijuana.

Benefits of CBD

While research on the potential benefits of cannabidiol is still in the early stages, there is already vast support in the community for incorporating it into a larger regimen for many chronic issues. The most researched and proven uses of CBD to date are to improve mood and manage inflammation.

CBD is most commonly used as a natural mood and energy enhancer. There are many other applications of CBD hemp flowers beyond these, however, including to help alleviate the following areas of concern:

Ingested CBD hemp flower, as distinct from smoked or vaporized, it may offer certain nutritional benefits as well. Hemp contains protein, fatty acids, vitamins and minerals. You can digest and absorb these nutrients when you consume CBD flowers in such forms as tinctures, edibles, pills and sprays.

One other important benefit of CBD hemp flower for many people, regardless of their primary reasons for using it, is that, unlike marijuana, it does not produce a psychoactive effect. While recreational cannabis users may seek out this effect, many people who could benefit from using cannabis are dissuaded from doing so because they consider this quality a negative side effect. 

Recent evidence has shown a difference in the level of benefits produced from “whole plant” CBD hemp flower and products containing merely an extracted CBD isolate. This is believed to be due to the presence of supporting cannabinoids and terpenes in the hemp flower, including small, non-psychoactive proportions of THC. Regardless of the benefits sought, products containing the entire CBD hemp flower can increase those aspects and produce a more significant overall effect.

Side Effects

In 2011, the journal Current Drug Safety determined that CBD produced no adverse effects on fundamental bodily functions including food intake and digestion, psychomotor and psychological functions, body temperature, blood pressure, and heart rate. CBD has also been found to be extraordinarily non-toxic with human subjects tolerating even extreme doses. No fatalities have been reported due to CBD intake, and the Department of Health and Human Services says no severe side effects or indications of toxicity even with chronic CBD use in generally healthy people.

A review in a 2017 issue of the journal Cannabis and Cannabinoid Research further discussed the side effects and safety of CBD. Citing many clinical studies, this review found the most common CBD side effects are appetite and weight changes, diarrhea and drowsiness or fatigue. CBD hemp flower has also been found to pose certain other potential side effects, including the following:

CBD may also increase liver enzyme levels, indicating potential liver inflammation or damage. Other health and safety concerns about CBD include its potential to interact with certain medications, including particular epilepsy drugs.

Additionally, while CBD oil contains very little to no THC, some CBD oil may contain large enough amounts of THC to produce psychoactive and euphoric effects. This can impair your abilities to operate machinery or drive a vehicle. It can also affect your mood, attention, memory, mental health and heart rate in both short-term and long-term ways.

Taking the proper dose of CBD is key to avoiding or aggravating side effects. Your method of ingesting CBD hemp flower can also play a role in the possibility of side effects. Smoking hemp in a bowl, joint or water pipe can produce the same side effects associated with smoking any substance, including coughing, irritation, dizziness and shortness of breath. Ingesting CBD hemp flower in edible, tincture, pill, spray or vaporized form, however, does not pose these same risks.

Types of CBD hemp flower extraction

There are many types of CBD extraction available, each one with its own pros and cons. However, the equipment required for extraction is quite costly, if you want to get the most efficient option. Here at Industrial Hemp Farms, we use mainly two extraction methods: CO2 and ethanol. Learn more about them below.

CO2 extraction

In this type of extraction, we use pressurized CO2 to extract the cannabinoids (in this case CBD) from the biomass. There are two subcategories in this extraction method: supercritical and subcritical. Both of these terms refer to the adjustment of the CO2 pressure, which in turn changes its solvency power. For example, when the temperature and pressure of CO2 are above 88ºF and 1083psi respectively, extraction is considered supercritical. When the temperature drops below 88ºF, CO2 turns into a liquid form and the extraction is supercritical.

In both cases, CO2 acts as an agent to separate the cannabinoids from the plant matter. Without getting too technical, supercritical CO2 extraction gets bigger yields of usable CBD extract, but it retains less of the original terpenes. On the contrary, with subcritical extraction, you get a smaller yield but a better cannabinoid profile. This process must be done in a lab, with expensive equipment and experienced personnel.

Ethanol

Apart from CO2, high-grade alcohol can be used as a solvent. This extraction method is considerably more affordable than super- and subcritical CO2 extraction. According to the FDA, ethanol is classified as a Class 3 risk solvent, meaning it has a low toxicity and therefore is perfectly safe for CBD extraction.

As with CO2 extraction, there are two types of ethanol extraction: room temperature and supercooled. The advantage of warm ethanol extraction is that it preserves more pigments and waxes from the CBD hemp flower, while chilled ethanol is quicker, but destroys most terpenes. Ultimately, supercooled ethanol extraction is by far the most affordable and quick option.

Which is the best type of CBD hemp flower extraction

The answer to this question depends on your particular needs and budget. Also, the type of finished product you want to make plays a big role in your final decision. For example, if your goal is grade-A vape juice, then you can’t go wrong with a clean CO2 extraction.

If you want to learn more about low-cost CBD extraction services at our Colorado Springs facilities, get in touch with one of our representatives to get detailed quotes about our equipment and which extraction process is better for you.

Where to buy wholesale CBD hemp flower in Colorado

If you are looking for affordable high CBD hemp flower for sale, reach out to us. Our hemp is locally sourced from our farms in Colorado Springs. We offer a wide array of wholesale CBD products, including hemp biomass, CBD isolates and distillates, while we also offer competitive extraction services and lab testing in our state of the art facilities.

If you want to create your own line of CBD products, you must make sure that the raw material you are getting is of the highest quality. Here at Industrial Hemp Farms, we can supply you with high-CBD hemp flower and help you in every step of the way towards creating your own products, including extraction and packaging. Contact us or call us at 800-985-9587 to schedule an appointment at our facilities in Colorado Springs!

Hemp oil is not approved for medicinal use by the FDA and is offered here strictly for research purposes only. Industrial Hemp Farms does not intend its products to be used to treat or cure any medical conditions, and makes no claims about it supposed efficacy in this area.

Futher Reading on CBD Hemp Flower

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George Mouratidis

George Mouratidis works as a full-time copywriter and journalist. He is the founder of WeedCopywriter.com, a bespoke content writing agency for the cannabis industry. George is a regular editor for many industry publications, as well as corporate blogs. He is also the co-writer of the book Ganja Hustle; a hit cannabis growing guide for the USA and Canada markets. When he is not writing, George likes to work out, trying new foods and playing with his cat. Currently, he lives in Greece.

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