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Grape God Cannabis Strain Review

July 16, 2020 Marijuana Strains Comments Off on Grape God Cannabis Strain Review

Grape God Cannabis Strain

While you’ve probably had your fair share of let-down varieties that just didn’t live up to the expectations their name set, Grape God ain’t here for that crap. With the strongest grape flavor and fragrance you’ve probably every encounter, this strain works hard to make sure it deserves its moniker. But more than just its flavor, the Grape God strain brings with it a world’s worth of good juju that can turn around your mood for the better.

A strong herb for uplifting an irritable, problematic, or worrisome disposition, the Grape God strain can take your frustrations and put you in a completely different state of mind. Easing away apprehension and distress, this variety promises to help you achieve the pinnacle of well-being and contentment with its well-balanced effects.

 

The Origins of the Grape God Strain

The Grape God cannabis strain was born from the union of two up-and-comers on the market. As of writing, neither parent can really be tagged a cannabis heavyweight, but that’s not really because of genetics. These herbs are some of the hardest to farm, making them an uncommon choice for farmers who want a surefire way to make a profit. Nonetheless, there are some out there who take their time with such difficult commodities, which is how the Grape God strain managed to enter the industry.

The first parent – God Bud – is an elusive indica that crosses Hawaiian, Purple Skunk, and a third strain that stems from Canada. Very little is known about this third parent strain, but many of those behind God Bud claim that the third member of the mix goes simply by the name ‘God’, not to be confused with God’s Gift. Together, this trifecta produces a euphoric calm that’s giggly, smiley, and easy to ride. It’s definitely not going to give you a jolt of extra energy, but the soothing effects do lend an interesting combo of collectedness and euphoria.

The Grapefruit strain is the second parent in the combination, and it sits on the compete opposite end of the genetic spectrum, demonstrating almost entirely sativa chemistry. Energetic and empowering, the Grapefruit strain is sweet and fruity, with undertones of bitterness just like its namesake. Perfect for combating a clouded mind, this strain also relieves head tension and turns around the mood for a more personable disposition.

 

Grape God Cannabis bud

 

Aroma and Appearance

First impressions of the Grape God strain might have you thinking twice about whether or not you’re looking at a cannabis strain all together. The ultra dark leaves – tinted in purple and blue – might look like they’re not from the same family as other varieties in the dispensary’s line-up. Nonetheless, the tell-tale hairs and tendrils give it away as a distinct member of the cannabis family.

The strain is coated in a rich outer layer of trichomes, glistening with the plant’s shiny resin. This nectar-like excretion is what contains the delicate cannabinoids and terpenes that give the herb its flavor, aroma, and effects. And needless to say, with such a thick outer coat, the nugs waft with the scent of its terpene blend the moment that you break the seal of the jar.

So what does it smell like, exactly? Like a bittersweet fruit. With a scent that resembles a pomelo, sliced wide open, and left under the heat of the sun on a hot summer day, the Grapefruit strain trickles with the aroma of fruit underlined with the bitterness of gasoline. All together, it can be a pleasant encounter with the mild bitter underscore serving its purpose of heightening the prominence of the sweetness.

 

Grape God terpene profile

 

Experience and Effects

Stuffed into a pipe and lit on fire, the Grape God strain lets off a taste that’s intensely similar to its aroma. The bitterness of the fruit definitely takes a front seat, amplified by the taste of burning organic material. Behind it, a backdrop of delicate fruity goodness swirls with the smoke which might lead you to want to chase after the flavor with another drag. But beware – taking a few extra tokes to fully experience that fruity undertone can be the reason for overindulgence.

And because of the kind of effects that the Grape God strain produces, the last thing you would want would be to take more than you can handle. The strain is known for its mood changing benefits and euphoria that can easily become a little overwhelming when taken in excess. With the right dosage however, the strain delivers a truly pleasant experience that can make you feel happy, giggly, and content.

At full swing, the Grape God strain should be able to wipe away both physical and cognitive distress. But more than that, it’s disposition redirection that really makes the Grape God strain top-shelf material. Imbuing the system with a sense of overwhelming well-being, there’s nothing that could ruin your day as long as you’ve got Grape God by your side.

 

Grape God Cannabis flower close up

 

Growing and Processing

The fragrant nugs, plus the strong resin production, make the Grape God variety a common choice for extraction. Do keep in mind however that it could take as much as 10 weeks to see a harvest with this strain. And because it is an indica leaning hybrid, its morphology is highly characteristic of its genetic profile. So a little topping now and again should help it reach its maximum height for greater harvests. If you can manage to prune your plant as often as you should, the entire thing might grow to about 4 to 5 feet, with a yield of 5 to 6 ounces for every square foot.

 

Who Is It For?

The Grape God herb is for anyone and everyone. Flavor wise, it won’t tick off a low tolerance user, and neither will it be too much of a lightweight for veterans and connoisseurs. In terms of effects – who doesn’t need to get away from it all every now and then? Its well-balanced indica effects and euphoric mood change can get this herb a place in the stash of cannabis users of all walks of life.

 

 

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