All products contain under 0.3% THC | Same day shipping

Boss OG Cannabis Strain Review

June 09, 2020 Marijuana Strains Comments Off on Boss OG Cannabis Strain Review

Boss OG Cannabis Strain

It’s been a rough workweek. The office? Stressful. Traffic? Insane. And your boss? Let’s not even go there. But hey, as the old adage says, there’s always a rainbow after the storm. And in this case, there’s nothing more blissfully rewarding than a couple of tokes of Boss OG. Achieving flawless 50-50 equilibrium, this hybrid’s slow and easy effects combine a balanced wakefulness with calm contentment.

And as it melts away the stresses of your hectic work schedule, this strain takes away every little thing that might be bogging down both mind and body. Lifting you off into a state of well-being, Boss OG can relieve your apprehension, jitters, and distress. Perfectly controlled, this herb just makes it clear – you’re definitely the boss here.

 

The Origins of Boss OG

Despite being relatively new to the cannabis scene, Boss OG’s popularity is on an upward trajectory. And that’s not only because of its own properties and benefits. On the contrary, this strain owes much of its prominence to its two equally formidable parent strains. Developed out of the marriage of OG Kush and Fire OG, Boss OG is quite literally a pure OG child – bringing together genetics from two herbs in the same OG family.

OG Kush is perhaps the parent of all parent strain. Often used for its potent chemistry, this herb emerged in the early 90’s as the child of a landrace. With genetics that are impressively close to naturally occurring marijuana, OG Kush is an indica biased hybrid that touts a complex aroma and mood boosting effects that make it a strong player in the cannabis market.

Fire OG is the son of OG Kush, so you might say that Boss OG was the result of inbreeding. But whatever the case, Fire OG brings with it long-lasting potency that burns through your body. In its wake, it leaves the ashes of complete relaxation and calm, often searing its user into the couch for hours upon hours of uninterrupted sleep or meditation.

 

Boss OG Cannabis bud

 

Appearance and Aroma

Oversized nugs characterize the Boss OG strain. With clusters that are up to 50% larger than other culvitars, this herb encapsulates its namesake as it sits pretty on a dispensary’s shelf. Next to any other typical herb, the Boss OG definitely commands attention and its size may be more than enough to get you to ask your friendly neighborhood budtender to take down the jar.

Upon closer inspection, the deep green nugs make it easier to see hints of deep purple and blue that wisp through the interiors of the clusters. Fiery orange hairs – inherited from the Fire OG parent – add a dimension of drama to the clusters, making them look even more appealing to the marijuana-head’s eyes.

As a pure OG product, the Boss OG strain is rich with the aroma (or stench, depends on how you like it) of the OG family tree. That means lots and lots of gasoline and lemon. Sure, for a beginner or low-tolerance user, the odor might leave a lot to be desired. But for the discerning cannabis veteran or connoisseur, the aroma that wafts from the herb’s leaves can be more than enough to tickle their interest.

 

Boss OG terpene profile

 

Experience and Effects

Boss OG is a hybrid that incorporates half and half of both genetic tendencies. That means that it brings together the effects of both indica and sativa to produce an experience that’s awakening yet restful, if that makes sense. Of course, the first thing you’ll notice when you take that toke is the strong gasoline and citrus taste that wraps around the tongue for complete sensory dominance. Needless to say, the aggressive flavor might be on the overwhelming side for the unsuspecting newbie. But veterans should find it to be perfectly delightful.

The creeping effects of the Boss OG strain work to slow down time. Blurring the lines between reality and fantasy, the strain can take you to a distant paradise of relaxation, bringing you on a vacation from the stress of daily life. The chemistry relieves physical stress and tension, and clears away any aches that might be bogging down on your body.

But as the soothing calm settles in, the strain also awakens a sense of well-being and euphoria. Gentle smiles will take over your disposition, and you’ll feel absolutely divorced from the thoughts and feelings that might make you feel distressed. The herb inspires a mildly higher level of energy, but it doesn’t force you to move or dispense power. Instead, it works to keep you awake and in control, helping you fully enjoy the course that the herb takes you on.

 

Boss OG Cannabis flower close up

 

Growing and Processing

The Boss OG herb grows to about 6 feet in height, and the towering structure leaves much room between each branch. For that reason, there might not be such a need for topping, but it might be necessary if you were hoping to direct growth. Relatively hardy, the Boss OG herb might thrive just fine outdoors thanks to its increased resilience to all sorts of cannabis plant diseases.

It takes anywhere from 8 to 10 weeks for the strain to reach maturity and harvest, which means you’ll have to wait a little longer than you would with strain like the Mango Kush. Nonetheless, every square foot of the Boss OG plant yields an average of 6 to 7 ounces of bud. So it really does make the long wait time worth it.

 

Who Is It For?

The Boss OG strain makes the ideal choice if you often find yourself struggling with the stress of a day of work. Developed and named for the sake of hardworking cannabis heads, Boss OG promises to melt away your worries and give you a taste of vacation leave as you sign off from the stresses of the real world and meditate on nothing other than happy thoughts and feelings of well-being.

While it isn’t exactly the fastest finisher, the Boss OG strain makes up for it with abundance of yield and ease of growth. So for first timer farmers in search of a no-fail herb, this cultivar might very well be the answer you’re looking for.

 

Latest posts by George Mouratidis (see all)

    Comments are closed.

    css.php